History

New Course: The Rise of Italian Fascism, c. 1911-1939

Key information:

Name: The Rise of Italian Fascism, c. 1911 – 1939

Tutor: Dr Hannah Malone (Lumley Junior Research Fellow at Magdalene College, Cambridge)

Number of Modules: 7

Module List:

  1. Introduction to Italian Fascism
  2. The First World War
  3. Modernity
  4. The Dead
  5. Colonial Wars
  6. Men and Women
  7. Conclusion

Description:

In this course, Dr Hannah Malone (University of Cambridge) explores the rise of Italian Fascism, focusing in particular on five key questions: (1) How did the experience of the First World War contribute to the rise of Fascism? (2) Was Fascism a forward-looking ideology? Did it embrace modernity or tradition? (3) What was the role of the dead in Fascism? (4) Why did the Fascist regime seek to gain colonies—in Libya, Ethiopia, and in the Balkan Peninsula? (5) How did Fascism seek to impact the lives of ordinary men and women?

Relevance to Specification:

This course is designed for students OCR History AS/A-Level GCE A, Unit Y220 (Italy 1896-1943) or Edexcel History AS/A-Level GCE, Paper 2, Option 2G.1 (The Rise and Fall of Fascism in Italy, c1911-46)

Advertisements

New Course: The Unification of Italy

Key information:

Name: The Unification of Italy

Tutor: Dr Marcella Sutcliffe (Research Fellow in History at Clare Hall, Cambridge)

Number of Modules: 7

Module List:

  1. Introduction
  2. Napoleon in Italy, 1796-1815
  3. The Restoration of the Old Order
  4. The 1848 Revolutions
  5. The Emergence of a National Consciousness
  6. The Role of Garibaldi
  7. Conclusion: United at Last?

Description:

In this course, Dr Marcella Sutcliffe (University of Cambridge) explores the Unification of Italy, starting with Napoleon’s invasion of Italy in the late 1790s, and ending with the famous Handshake of Teano in 1861, where Giuseppe Garibaldi handed over control of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies to Victor Emmanuel II of Piedmont-Sardinia. As we move through the course, we think about the impact of Napoleon’s reforms on Italy; the extent to which these reforms were reversed in following the Congress of Vienna in 1815 and the various insurrections that followed; the outbreak of rebellions in 1848, including the Five Days in Milan and the declaration of the Republic of Rome; the growth of a national consciousness in the years following the crushing of the democrat movements in 1848-49; and the life, career, and celebrity of Garibaldi, his Expedition of the Thousand to Sicily, and the declaration of the Kingdom of Italy in 1861. The course ends by considering the challenges that faced Italy after 1861, including the continued opposition of the Catholic church, and the fact that Rome and Venice remained under the control of the Pope and the Austrians, respectively.

Relevance to Specification:

This course is designed for students taking OCR GCE AS/A Level in History [Unit F964, Option B, Study Topic 2: The Unification of Italy, 1815-70) or Edexcel GCE AS/A Level in History [Paper 2, Option 2D.1: The Unification of Italy, c1830-70].

New Course: British History: The End of the British Empire, 1945-68

Key information:

Name: British History: The End of the British Empire, 1945-68

Tutor: Dr Simon Potter (Reader in History at the University of Bristol)

Number of Modules: 6

Module List:

  1. Introduction
  2. The Legacies of the Second World War
  3. Retreat or Renewal?
  4. Suez and its Aftermath
  5. The Winds of Change
  6. An Unwished-For Future

Description:

In this course, Dr Simon Potter (University of Bristol) explores the final decades of the British Empire, from the end of the Second World War in 1945 to Britain’s withdrawal of troops “East of Suez”, announced by Harold Wilson in 1968. As we move through the course, we think about the impact of the Second World War, the withdrawal of India and Burma from the Empire in the late 1940s, the Suez Crisis of 1956, Harold Macmillan’s now famous ‘Wind of Change’ speech, delivered in Cape Town in 1960.

Relevance to Specification:

This course is designed for students looking at Britain in the years following the Second World War. Relevant options include: OCR History AS/A-Level GCE A Unit Y113 (Britain 1930-1997); AQA History AS/A Level GCE Unit 1J, Part Two (‘Imperial Retreat, 1914-1967), and Edexcel History AS/A Level GCE Option 1H (Britain Transformed, 1918-97).

New Course: British History: British Government in the Age of Revolution, 1783-1832

Key information:

Name: British History: British Government in the Age of Revolution, 1783-1832

Tutor: Dr Sarah Richardson (Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Warwick)

Number of Modules: 7

Module List:

  1. How revolutionary were radical movements after 1789?
  2. What was the appeal of ‘popular conservatism’ during the French Revolution?
  3. How successful were Pitt’s domestic policies?
  4. Does the early nineteenth century witness the evolution of the Liberal and Conservative parties?
  5. What Luddism a ‘backward-looking’ movement?
  6. Did Peterloo lead to the Reform Act of 1832?
  7. Did the Reform Act radically change electoral politics?

Description:

In this course, Dr Sarah Richardson (University of Warwick) explores British politics between the start of the French Revolution in 1789 to the Great Reform Act of 1832. As we move through the course, we think about seven key historical questions from the period, including popular reactions to the French Revolution, the nature of Luddism, the impact of the Peterloo Massacre of 1819, and the impact of the Great Reform Act of 1832.

Relevance to Specification:

This course is designed for students OCR History AS/A-Level GCE A, Unit Y110 (From Pitt to Peel, 1783-1853), Part I (British Government in the Age of Revolution, 1783-1832).